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Marlene Milasus, OSB

Sister Marlene Milasus is a member of Benedictine Sisters of Elizabeth, NJ, St Walburga Monastery. Currently, she is serving as community treasurer and liturgist. She works in a monastery retreat program and is a licensed New Jersey boiler operator!

Sister Marlene's reflections begin Easter Sunday and continue through Pentecost.


Third Sunday of Easter

Third Sunday of Easter
April 18, 2011
Marlene Milasus, OSB, Benedictine Sisters of Elizabeth, NJ

Easter Dinner
Today’s Gospel is actually the sequel to the Emmaus story; the two disciples who met Jesus on the road and recognized him in the breaking of bread now bring the message back to Jerusalem. And even as they announce their amazing news, there’s Jesus, in their midst, with the simple greeting of “Peace be with you.” To address the doubt of the group, Jesus shows his wounds, and then takes a piece of baked fish and eats it. He explains the Scriptures and how he has fulfilled them, and then charges the disciples with the task of being his witnesses. 

There’s another scene, in the Acts of the Apostles, where Jesus similarly tells the disciples that they are to be witnesses in Jerusalem, and out to the farthest reaches of the world. That means us. We are recipients of this message, but even more amazing: we too, wherever we are, are witnesses to that original stunning revelation that “He whom you seek has risen”.

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Second Sunday of Easter

Second Sunday of Easter
April 11, 2011
Marlene Milasus, OSB, Benedictine Sisters of Elizabeth, NJ

Easter Every Day
It’s ironic that, prior to the Vatican II renewal of the liturgy, this Sunday had come to be known as “Low Sunday” – to distinguish it from the ecstatic joy of Easter Sunday seven days before.

For the earliest Christians, there was nothing low about any Sunday. It was the day to celebrate the Resurrection throughout the year, because of Scriptural references to the Risen Lord being with his disciples on Easter Sunday, and then again one week later. How did the community celebrate? By hearing the Word proclaimed, and then by sharing at the Lord’s table every Sunday, just like those disciples on the road to Emmaus, on the first Easter evening.

Years ago, a Catholic publishing house offered as one of its Easter cards a close-up photo of a loaf of bread and a cup of wine. On the picture were the words “Easter Every Day”. 

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Easter Sunday

Easter Sunday
April 4, 2021
Marlene Milasus, OSB, Benedictine Sisters of Elizabeth, NJ

Turning Points
When I do a talk on the liturgy, and especially on Eucharist or on the Church year, I usually begin by asking the participants to reflect silently for a few minutes on some significant turning point in their lives. I don’t ask them to share their turning points, but I do ask them to consider that a real turning point has three qualities: 1) it takes you irrevocably from an old life to a new life; 2) it grows as time passes, taking on new and deeper meaning; 3) it can be celebrated over and over, perhaps publicly, always personally, even if the celebration is simply the memory that “on this day…..(fill in the blank) happened.”

What we celebrate today, on Easter Sunday, is the culmination of the last four days, beginning with the Mass of the Lord’s Supper on Holy Thursday, continuing through the Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion on Good Friday, moving quietly through the seeming emptiness of Holy Saturday, and finally climaxing at the Easter Vigil and Easter Sunday celebrations.

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